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April is Testicular Cancer Awareness Month

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Testicular cancer, a disease that occurs when cancer cells form in one or both testicles, will be diagnosed in approximately 10,000 men in the U.S. in 2019. According to the American Cancer Society, close to 500 men die each year from this type of cancer. April is Testicular Cancer Awareness Month, which provides an opportunity to bring awareness and education to men and the women who care about them, by encouraging men to perform regular testicular self-exams and to visit a doctor for a physical and a testicular exam each year.

Testicular cancer has been increasing in the U.S. and worldwide over recent decades. The average age at the time of diagnosis is 33. Testicular cancer can be treated successfully, so the risk of a fatal outcome is low; however, this is largely due to discovering it early, so the importance of regular screenings and exams can not be overstated.

Potential risk factors include having an undescended testicle; having certain types of moles on the back, chest, belly, and face; and having an HIV infection or AIDS. Family history also plays a role; if a man has testicular cancer, there's an increased risk his brothers or sons may develop it. White American men are about 5 to 10 times more likely to develop testicular cancer than African-American men, and twice as likely as Asian-American men.

Some possible signs of testicular cancer include a lump or swelling in a testicle, a feeling of heaviness or aching in the belly or in the scrotum, tender breasts, and loss of sex drive. If testicular cancer is suspected, your doctor will recommend additional testing, including an ultrasound, a blood test, a biopsy, or an imaging test like an MRI or CT scan.

At Morrison Community Hospital, Dr. Mathew Mathew, Board Certified Urologist, offers screenings, examinations, and treatments for testicular cancer. For more information, please contact:

Morrison Community Hospital

303 North Jackson Street

Morrison, IL 61270

815-772-5511

www.morrisonhospital.com