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Three things your funeral director wants you to know

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Planning a funeral service for a loved one can be challenging. For grieving families, especially those going through the planning process for the first time, the process is daunting. This is where the funeral director is ready to help.

The funeral director’s job is to coordinate each step and help create the proper service for family and friends to gather and celebrate the deceased’s life. You may have a basic understanding of the funeral director’s job, but because of their unique occupation, there may also be some misconceptions.

Here are just a few things your funeral director wants you to know:

1. They help with all the details and paperwork

A large part of the funeral director’s job is completing the necessary documents to obtain a death certificate, make the service arrangements, secure a burial plot and equipment, and possibly write the obituary as well. They also help notify people of the planned service(s). All this work and more is completed by, or in cooperation with, the funeral director, to ease the burden on you and your family.

2. Funeral directors are well-educated and creative

A lot of specific training and education are required to become a licensed funeral director. After completing an approved mortuary science program (which is often after college), they are required to complete a one to three-year apprenticeship and then pass a state license exam. Directors must also be creative in the way they plan unique and customized services. They often take special requests from families, and assist in planning the decorations or special themes, too.

3. It is a calling for them

Many funeral directors are second, third or even fourth generation in their profession, where they carry on their family’s tradition of helping others in need. Funeral directors are often inspired by events they witnessed growing up or during their studies that reinforce a belief in their calling to be a funeral director.

For more information and questions on which type of service may be the best for you and your family, please visit our website, or call us at 815-288-2241.

Jones Funeral Home

204 S Ottawa Ave

Dixon, IL 61021